Bringing Japan to Italy: episode 09 - Codice Bianco

A few months ago, in conjunction with the Novegro comics festival, we had the opportunity to interview Codice Bianco. For this ninth episode of 『Bringing Japan to Italy』, the artist specializing in sculptures and origami speaks to our microphones.

Codice Bianco kindly granted us this exclusive interview for Japan Italy Bridge to help promote and share more and more Japanese culture. Furthermore, we talk about how the art of creating origami has spread in Italy over the last ten years.

Special Thanks: Associazione Ocha Caffè


Bringing Japan to Italy: episode 08 - Alex Kerr

In conjunction with the release of his book "Lost Japan", Alex Kerr held a conference at the Palazzo Reale in Milan. We at Japan Italy Bridge had the opportunity to meet him and ask him some questions.

In this episode 8 of our Bringing Japan to Italy series, Alex Kerr tells us about his secret Japan. Son of an American navy family, from a young age he travels the world between Italy, Japan, USA, and then returns to the land of the Rising Sun. Since his college years, Alex Kerr has made Kyoto his life base.

Here he discovered a new world, a Japan that we Westerners can hardly see. A country made of traditions, small villages and thatched-roof houses with antique wood floors. He tells us how his life has changed thanks to winning the Scincho Gakugei literary prize. As a result, Alex Kerr came into contact with a group of Litterti and Japanese artists with whom he still collaborates today.

But now we leave you with the words of Alex Kerr and his secret Japan. Enjoy the video!

Special Thanks: Associazione Giappone in Italia

Lost Japan: Amazon US


Bringing Japan to Italy: episode 07 - Yoko Takada

A few months ago, in conjunction with the Novegro comics festival, we had the opportunity to interview Yoko Takada. For this seventh episode of 『Bringing Japan to Italy』, the artist specializing in Japanese culture, tea ceremonies, Kimono dressing and much more speaks to our microphones.

Yoko Takada has kindly granted this exclusive interview for Japan Italy Bridge to help promote and share more the Japanese culture. Furthermore, we talk about the similarities between Japan and Italy, and why the bow is so important in the land of the rising sun. Did you know that? Enjoy the video!


Bringing Japan to Italy: episode 06 – Takarabune

A few months ago, in conjunction with the Japan Matsuri in Bellinzona, we had the opportunity to interview one of the very few Awa Odori dance troupe: Takarabune!

The Awa Dance Festival (阿波踊り), the largest dance festival in Japan, is held from August 12th to 15th as part of the Bon Festival in Tokushima prefecture of Shikoku in Japan.
The earliest origins of this style of dace are found in the Japanese Buddhist priesthood dances of Nembutsu-odori and hiji-odori of the Kamakura period (1185 – 1333), and also in the kumi-odori, a lively crop dance that was known to last for several days.

The Takarabune group has been traveling the world for years to bring joy and to share the culture of Japanese festivals with all other foreign nations.
In an exclsive interview for Japan Italy Bridge they tell us how they see the relationship between Italy and Japan and their thoughts on our beautiful country. Enjoy!

Follow Takarabune

Website: takarabune.org
Facebook: facebook.com/Takarabune.official
Instagram: @takarabune_official
Twitter: @Takarabune_info


Festa del Giappone @ Circolo Magnolia

On June 9, 2019, at the Circolo Magnolia located at Parco Idroscalo, an entire day dedicated to Japanese culture will be held. There will be many workshops, demonstrations and important personalities known in the world of the Rising Sun. Obviously, you can also taste the coveted Japanese food and sake.

Many are the workshop available for the audience! You can find the manga drawing workshop curated by Giappone in Italia, focusing mainly on the character design. Furthermore, you will find the Lykke Anholm workshop, the Italian ambassador of the KonMari method, focusing on the whole philosophy underlying the worldwide phenomenon of Marie Kondo. Also, have you ever heard of Kintsugi? It’s the ancient and very significant Japanese art of repairing ceramics with urushi lacquer and gold dust. The restorative artist Chiara Lorenzetti will explain this in the smallest detail.

A dive into Japanese tradition with some demonstrations, including the Yukata Dressing by Mamiko Ikeda and the evocative Tea Ceremony by Alberto Moro. IFIORINELLARETE takes care of the demonstration of Kokedama, a technique in which a seedling is removed from its own pot and wrapped in a ball made with a mixture of different substrates, covered with fresh moss. The plant created can be placed on a flat surface, or left floating in the air for an even more suggestive effect. The famous Keiko Irimajiri will present her Bentō Showcooking while Luca Vecchi will tell us about the concept of his work Okaa-Sama | Honorable Mother.
Surely you already met this artist in the exhibition that was held on May 10th and you can also watch his video interview here below.

And for all the people that love the Japanese language, Eurasia Language Academy will hold An interactive language course! Curious?

We’ll be waiting for you on June 9th at Circolo Magnolia, Parco idroscalo. We’ll be there, what about you??

Info & Prevendite

Pre-sale: bit.ly/Prevendite_LaFestaDelGiappone
Organisation: Associazione Culturale Giappone in Italia
Website: www.giapponeinitalia.org
Mail: info@giapponeinitalia.org


Bringing Japan to Italy: episode 04 – Takeuchi Hideki

On the occasion of the Far East Film Festival, we had the honor and pleasure of being able to interview Takeuchi Hideki, director of "Fly me to the Saitama" (翔んで埼玉 - Tonde Saitama), presented in Italy during the festival for its European premiere!

Takeuchi Hideki made his debut working for Fuji Television and in 1996 he directed the first of his series for this TV station. In 1998 he won the award for best director at the Television Drama Academy Awards for "Just a Little More, God" but the awards won didn't stop there.

His movie debut came in 2009 with the dramatic two-part musical comedy Nodame Cantabile. Takeuchi Hideki continues to alternate between the big and small screen with Thermae Romae and two television series, passing with great ease from the historical drama to the brilliant comedy.

Thermae Romae has achieved such a resounding success in the Japanese box office that Takeuchi-san created the sequel, Thermae Romae II, released on April 26, 2014 and previewed after a week at the 16th Far East Film Festival in Udine, Italy.

This year, the director returned to the Far East Film Festival with "Fly me to the Saitama", a brilliant and somewhat surreal comedy about the parochialism that exists between Saitama and Tokyo, starring singer and actor GACKT-san and actress Fumi Nikaido, supported by other famous names within the cast. Fly me to the Saitama, also won the MyMovies.com award for best film acclaimed by the public.

The one with Takeuchi-san was an interesting and entertaining interview that tells the backstage of the film, curiosities and perspectives for future collaboration between Italy and Japan. Enjoy the video and we are curious to know your feedback!


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Bringing Japan to Italy: episode 03 – RIADO space design

During the Milan Design Week we had the pleasure of attending a very special exhibition and also the pleasure of interviewing two Japanese artists present in the Lombard capital. We are talking about Sachiko Hiroiuchi, designer at RIADO space design, and Ayumi Shima, designer of fabrics directly from Japan.

Born in Fukui, Japan, Sachiko Hiroiuchi lives and works in Osaka where in her studio RIADO focuses on design for shops, restaurants, offices, apartments, and in the field of interior industrial design. Her activity is focused on the design of furniture, lighting and furnishing accessories.

As a designer, she works alongside a research activity on materials where she has a great sensitivity in the artistic field. And it is precisely here that she develops themes on the paper of the raw material such as "Kozo", "Mitsumata" and "Gampi" with themes focusing on traditional Japanese craftsmanship where each work is made with great care.

The textures you will see in the video are the work of Ayumi Shima, a Japanese artist and textile designer, born in Kyoto, Japan, where she lives and works.
Specialized in the field of textile design, she develops artistic themes with specific research in the artistic pictorial field. Her particular interest is the color related to the textile material and her works are characterized by variations in colors and transparencies related to the material.

In her artistic baggage, she does not forget her tradition and, attracted by older techniques such as the Japanese press, Ayumi works with great sensitivity with references to nature such as natural light, flowers, trees, the forest.

Sunbeams Leaves

With this exhibition "SUNBEAMS LEAVES" the authors Sachiko Horiuchi and Ayumi Shima propose an installation featuring paper and fabric interpreting the four seasons.
Creating a path that accompanies the visitor in exploring the transparencies created by the "ray of light" on materials, the protagonists of this exhibition are traditional Japanese paper and delicate colored fabrics. These materials dance together with the light that is filtered transmitting the color of the sky, water, earth, but also the color of the forest and nature where light is the main character.

The exhibition took place at AD GALLERY focusing on specific themes such as what light and color offer and was the result of a long research work by the artists.

Now we leave you to our video interview and we are curious about your feedback! Enjoy the show!


Japan Travel: Tokyo Rainbow Pride

Spring is here and the Golden Week celebration is upon Japan. This is a significant point in time for the people of Japan, but it is especially so for the LGBT community residing there because it is when this year’s edition of Tokyo Rainbow Pride (TRP2019) will be held as well!

Photo credit: tokyorainbowpride.com

Tokyo Rainbow Pride originated from the very first LGBT movement in Japan was held 25 years ago on 28 August 1994. Back then, around a thousand people gathered to march with the rainbow flag from Shinjuku Central Park to Shibuya’s Miyashita Park in the Tokyo Lesbian & Gay Parade. Since then, it has gone on for almost every year, eventually changing its name to Tokyo Rainbow Pride (TRP) in 2007.

With the theme of “I Have Pride”, this year’s TRP is slated to be the biggest of all, with a record number of 52 groups having pre-registered for the event. Furthermore, the main event, the colourfully flamboyant parade, is free for all to participate in this year. The parade will start at 2 p.m. on Sunday, 28 April, and it is a 3km march in the area of Harajuku and Shibuya, so if you’re going to be in Tokyo this weekend, do watch out for the crowds, or, better yet, show your support and join in!

Photo credit: mainichi.jp

After the Parade concludes, the Pride Parade After-Party/Pride Carnival will begin, lasting through the night at Aisotope Lounge in Shinjuku Nichome, Tokyo’s own gay district. This is, however, not the end of the festivities.

The full run of TRP2019 starts on 27 April and lasts all the way until 6 May, ending with the Pride Recovery Party at TRUNK(HOTEL). It is without a doubt that there will be many more activities which celebrate love being held during this entire week. The full list of events can be found here: tokyorainbowpride.com/week/

Companies like PlayStation, AIG, Visitaly, SEGA, Spotify, BuzzFeed Japan and many others are supporting the event as sponsors and partners as well and looking at how much the event has grown over the years, it can be said that support for the LGBT community and sexual minorities in Tokyo, at least, is growing. And that, for sure, is a heartening thing to see in today’s world.

For more information, visit Tokyo Rainbow Pride’s official website tokyorainbowpride.com

 

Photo credit: tokyorainbowpride.com